AWS Cloud Protection Manager Part 2: Configuration

Overview

As we discussed in Part 1 of this series, snapshots serve as a good basis to implement backup in AWS. But AWS does not provide an out-of-the-box tool that can manage snapshots at scale and perform snapshot creation/deletion based on a defined retention. Rich AWS APIs allow you to build such tool yourself or you can use an existing backup solution built for AWS. In this blog post we are looking at one such product, called Cloud Protection Manager.

You will be surprised to know that the first version of Cloud Protection Manager was released back in 2013. The product has matured over the years and the current CPM version 2.1 according to N2W web-site has become quite popular amongst AWS customers.

CPM is offered in four different versions: Standard, Advanced, Enterprise and Enterprise Plus. Functionality across all four versions is mostly the same, with the key difference being the number of instances you can backup. Ranging from 20 instances in Standard and $5 per instance in Enterprise Plus.

Installation

CPM offers a very straightforward consumption model. You purchase it from AWS marketplace and pay by the month. Licensing costs are billed directly to your account. There are no additional steps involved.

To install CPM you need to find the version you want to purchase in AWS Marketplace, specify instance settings, such as region, VPC subnet, security group, then accept the terms and click launch. AWS will spin up a new CPM server as an EC2 instance for you. You also have an option to run a 30-day trial if you want to play with the product before making a purchasing decision.

Note that CPM needs to be able to talk to AWS API endpoints to perform snapshots, so make sure that the appliance has Internet access by means of a public IP address, Elastic IP address or a NAT gateway. Similarly, the security group you attach it to should at least have HTTPS out allowed.

Initial Configuration

Appliance is then configured using an initial setup wizard. Find out what private IP address has been assigned to the instance and open a browser session to it. The wizard is reasonably straightforward, but there are two things I want to draw your attention to.

You will be asked to create a data volume. This volume is needed purely to keep CPM configuration and metadata. Backups are kept in S3 and do not use this volume. The default size is 5GB, which is enough for roughly 50 instances. If you have a bigger environment allocate 1GB per every 10 AWS instances.

You will also need to specify AWS credentials for CPM to be able to talk to AWS APIs. You can use your AWS account, but this is not a security best practice. In AWS you can assign a role to an EC2 instance, which is what you should be using for CPM. You will need to create IAM policies that essentially describe permissions for CPM to create backups, perform restores, send notifications via AWS SNS and configure EC2 instances. Just refer to CPM documentation, copy and paste configuration for all policies, create a role and specify the role in the setup wizard.

Backup Policies

Once you are finished with the initial wizard you will be able to log in to the appliance using the password you specified during installation. As in most backup solutions you start with backup policies, which allow you to specify backup targets, schedule and retention.

One thing that I want to touch on here is backup schedules, that may be a bit confusing at start. It will be easier to explain it in an example. Say you want to implement a commonly used GFS backup schedule, with 7 daily, 4 weekly, 12 monthly and 7 yearly backups. Daily backup should run every day at 8pm and start from today. Weekly backups run on Sundays.

This is how you would configure such schedule in CPM:

  • Daily
    • Repeats Every: 1 Days
    • Start Time: Today Date, 20:00
    • Enabled on: Mon-Sat
  • Weekly
    • Repeats Every: 1 Weeks
    • Start Time: Next Sunday, 20:00
    • Enabled on: Mon-Sun
  • Monthly
    • Repeats Every: 1 Months
    • Start Time: 28th of this month, 21:00
    • Enabled on: Mon-Sun
  • Yearly:
    • Repeats Every: 12 Months
    • Start Time: 31st of December, 22:00
    • Enabled on: Mon-Sun

Some of the gotchas here:

  • “Enabled on” setting is relevant only to the Daily backup, the rest of the schedules are based on the date you specify in “Start Time” field. For instance, if you specify a date in the Weekly backup Start Time that is a Sunday, your weekly backups will run every Sunday.
  • Make sure to run your Monthly backup on 28th day of every month, to guarantee you have a backup every month, including February.
  • It’s not possible to prevent Weekly backup to not run on the last week of every month. So make sure to adjust the Start Time for the Monthly backup so that Weekly and Monthly backups don’t run at the same time if they happen to fall on the same day.
  • Same considerations are true for the Yearly backup as well.

Then you create your daily, weekly, monthly and yearly backup policies using the corresponding schedules and add EC2 instances that require protection to every policy. Retention is also specified at the policy level. According to our scenario we will have 6 generations for Daily, 4 generations for Weekly, 12 generations for Monthly and 7 generations for Yearly.

Notifications

CPM uses AWS Simple Notification Service (SNS) to send email alerts. If you gave CPM instance SNS permissions in IAM role you created previously, you should be able to simply go to Notification settings, enable Alerts and select “Create new topic” and “Add user email as recipient” options. CPM will create a SNS topic in AWS for you automatically and use email address you specified in the setup wizard to send notifications to. You can change or add more email addresses to the SNS topic in AWS console later on if you need to.

Conclusion

This is all you need to get your Cloud Protection Manager up and running. In the next blog post we will look at how instances are backed up and restored and discuss some of the advanced backup options CPM offers.

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