NSX Optimistic Locking and PowerNSX

Recently, when working on some NSX-V automation, I came across an interesting issue, which I want to discuss here, since there’s almost no information on the Internet (while I’m writing this), that would help to solve it or even point you in the right direction. It has to do with PowerNSX and Optimistic Locking in NSX (which technically is not even a locking mechanism), but let’s start from the beginning.

If you ever used PowerNSX module to automate NSX via PowerShell you noticed that most of the code examples use pipelines to run PowerNSX cmdlets. So instead of using variables, like so:

$Edge = Get-NsxEdge vRA7 _ edge
$LoadBalancer = Get-NsxLoadBalancer -Edge $Edge
Set-NsxLoadBalancer -LoadBalancer $LoadBalancer -enabled
New-NsxLoadBalancerApplicationProfile -LoadBalancer $LoadBalancer -Name $WebAppProfileName -Type $VipProtocol –SslPassthrough

all commands are run this way instead:

Get-NsxEdge vRA7_edge | Get-NsxLoadBalancer | Set-NsxLoadBalancer -enabled
Get-NsxEdge vRA7_dge | Get-NsxLoadBalancer | New-NsxLoadBalancerApplicationProfile -Name $WebAppProfileName -Type $VipProtocol –SslPassthrough

What’s the difference you may ask, besides the fact the the second variant is slower, because you retrieve edge and load balancer objects multiple times, instead of once, compared to the first variant? There’s actually a strong reason for it. More specifically, it is the following error that you gonna get if you don’t use pipelines:

invoke-nsxwebrequest : Invoke-NsxWebRequest : The NSX API response received indicates a failure. 409 : Conflict : Response Body: {“errorCode”:101, “details”:”Concurrent object access error. Refresh UI or fetch the latest copy of the object and retry the operation.”, “rootCauseString”:null, “moduleName”:null, “errorData”:null}

See, NSX uses Optimistic Locking (yes, there’s Pessimistic Locking as well) to handle concurrency. Its purpose is to make sure that if you’re making a change to an object in NSX you are aware of its current state. In the above example, you saved load balancer into a variable, changed the load balancer state to enabled and then tried to create an application profile, supplying load balancer saved in a variable as a parameter to the cmdlet. But the load balancer (and edge) state has changed and you’re basically using an old (stale) version of the object. You either have to retrieve the current state of the object again or avoid this issue all together by simply using pipelines and retrieve the up-to-date version of the object with every call.

Read this article if you want to know more about Optimistic Locking:

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