Posts Tagged ‘appliance’

[SOLVED] Migrating vCenter Notifications

January 6, 2018

Why is this a problem?

VMware upgrades and migrations still comprise a large chunk of what I do in my job. If it is an in-place upgrade it is often more straightforward. The main consideration is making sure all compatibility checks are made. But if it is a rebuild, things get a bit more complicated.

Take for example a vCenter Server to vCenter Server Appliance migration. If you are migrating between 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 you are covered by the vCenter Server Migration Tool. Recently I came across a customer using vSphere 5.1 (yes, it is not as uncommon as you might think). vCenter Server Migration Tool does not support migration from vSphere 5.1, which is fair enough, as it is end of support was August 2016. But as a result, you end up being on your own with your upgrade endeavours and have to do a lot of the things manually. One of such things is migrating vCenter notifications.

You can go and do it by hand. Using a few PowerCLI commands you can list the currently configured notifications and then recreate them on the new vCenter. But knowing how clunky and slow this process is, I doubt you are looking forward to spend half a day configuring each of the dozens notifications one by one by hand (I sure am not).

I offer an easy solution

You may have seen a comic over on xkcd called “Is It Worth The Time?“. Which gives you an estimate of how long you can work on making a routine task more efficient before you are spending more time than you save (across five years). As an example, if you can save one hour by automating a task that you do monthly, even if you spend two days on automating it, you will still brake even in five years.

Knowing how often I do VMware upgrades, it is well worth for me to invest time in automating it by scripting. Since you do not do upgrades that often, for you it is not, so I wrote this script for you.

If you simply want to get the job done, you can go ahead and download it from my GitHub page here (you will also need VMware PowerCLI installed on your machine for it to work) and then run it like so:

.\copy-vcenter-alerts-v1.0.ps1 -SourceVcenter old-vc.acme.com -DestinationVcenter new-vc.acme.com

Script includes help topics, that you can view by running the following command:

Get-Help -full .\copy-vcenter-alerts-v1.0.ps1

Or if you are curious, you can read further to better understand how script works.

How does this work?

First of all, it is important to understand the terminology used in vSphere:

  • Alarm trigger – a set of conditions that must be met for an alarm warning and alert to occur.
  • Alarm action – operations that occur in response to triggered alarms. For example, email notifications.

Script takes source and destination vCenter IP addresses or host names as parameters and starts by retrieving the list of existing alerts. Then it compares alert definitions and if alert doesn’t exist on the destination, it will be skipped, so be aware of that. Script will show you a warning and you will be able to make a decision about what to do with such alert later.

Then for each of the source alerts, that exists on the destination, script recreates actions, with exact same triggers. Trigger settings, such as repeats (enabled/disabled) and trigger state changes (green to yellow, yellow to red, etc) are also copied.

Script will not attempt to recreate an action that already exists, so feel free to run the script multiple times, if you need to.

What script does not do

  1. Script does not copy custom alerts – if you have custom alert definitions, you will have to recreate them manually. It was not worth investing time in such feature at this stage, as custom alerts are rare and even if encountered, there us just a handful, that can be moved manually.
  2. Only email notification actions are supported – because they are the most common. If you use other actions, like SNMP traps, let me know and maybe I will include them in the next version.

PowerCLI cmdlets used

These are some of the useful VMware PowerCLI cmdlets I used to write the script:

  • Get-AlarmDefinition
  • Get-AlarmAction
  • Get-AlarmActionTrigger
  • New-AlarmAction
  • New-AlarmActionTrigger
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Error When Deploying VCSA or PSC

October 31, 2017

Recently when helping a customer to deploy a new greenfield VMware 6.5 environment I ran into an issue where brand new vCenter Server Appliance and Platform Service Controller 6.5 build 5973321 fail to deploy to an ESXi host build 5969303.

Stage 1 (install) of the deployment completes successfully. In Stage 2 (setup) VCSA installer both for vCenter and PSC first shows a prompt asking for credentials.

PSC Issue Description

After providing credentials, when installing an external PSC, installation fails with the following error:

Error:
Unable to connect to vCenter Single Sign-On: Failed to connect to SSO; uri:https://psc-hostname/sts/STSService/vsphere.local
Failed to register vAPI Endpoint Service with CM
Failed to configure vAPI Endpoint Service at the firstboot time

Resolution:
Please file a bug against VAPI

Installation wizard shows the following resulting error:

Failure:
A problem occurred during setup. Refresh this page and try again.

A problem occurred during setup. Services might not be working as expected.

A problem occurred while – Starting VMware vAPI Endpoint…

Appliance shows the following error in console:

Failed to start services. Firstboot Error.

Alternatively PSC can fail with the following error:

Error:
Unexpected failure: }
Failed to register vAPI Endpoint Service with CM
Failed to configure vAPI Endpoint Service at the firstboot time

Resolution:
Please file a bug against VAPI

VCSA Issue Description

After providing credentials, when installing vCenter with embedded PSC, installation fails with the following error:

Error:
Unable to start the Service Control Agent.

Resolution:
Search for these symptoms in the VMware knowledge base for any known issues and possible workarounds. If none can be found, collect a support bundle and open a support request.

Installation wizard shows the following resulting error:

Failure:
A problem occurred during setup. Refresh this page and try again.

A problem occurred during setup. Services might not be working as expected.

A problem occurred while – Starting VMware Service Control Agent…

Appliance shows the same error in console.

Alternatively VCSA can fail with the following error:

Error:
Encountered an internal error. Traceback (most recent call last): File “/usr/lib/vmidentity/firstboot/vmidentity-firstboot.py”, line 1852, in main vmidentityFB.boot() File “/usr/lib/vmidentity/firstboot/vmidentity-firstboot.py”, line 359, in boot self.checkSTS(self.__stsRetryCount, self.__stsRetryInterval) File “/usr/lib/vmidentity/firstboot/vmidentity-firstboot.py”, line 1406, in checkSTS raise Exception(‘Failed to initialize Secure Token Server.’) Exception: Failed to initialize Secure Token Server.

Resolution:
This is an unrecoverable error, please retry install. If you run into this error again, please collect a support bundle and open a support request.

Issue Workaround

This issue happens when VCSA or PSC installation was cancelled and is attempted for the second time to the same ESXi host.

Identified workaround for this issue is to use another ESXi host, which has never been used to deploy PSC or VCSA to.

Issue Resolution

VMware is aware of the bug and working on the resolution.

NetApp Active/Active Cabling

October 9, 2011

Cabling for active/active NetApp cluster is defined in Active/Active Configuration Guide. It’s described in detail but may be rather confusing for beginners.

First of all we use old DATA ONTAP 7.2.3. Much has changed since it’s release, particularly in disk shelves design. If documentation says:

If your disk shelf modules have terminate switches, set the terminate switches to Off on all but the last disk shelf in loop 1, and set the terminate switch on the last disk shelf to On.

You can be pretty much confident that you won’t have any “terminate switches”. Just skip this step.

To configuration types. We have two NetApp Filers and four disk shelves – two FC and two SATA. You can connect them in several ways.

First way is making two stacks (formely loops) each will be built from shelves of the same type. Each filer will own its stack. This configuration also allows you to implement multipathing. Lets take a look at picture from NetApp flyer:

Solid blue lines show primary connection. Appliance X (AX) 0a port is connected to Appliance X Disk Shelf 1 (AXDS1) A-In port, AXDS1 A-Out port is connected to AXDS2 A-In port. This comprises first stack. Then AY 0c port is connected to AYDS1 A-In port, AYDS1 A-Out port is connected to AYDS2 A-In port. This comprises second stack. If you leave it this way you will have to fully separate stacks.

If you want to implement active/active cluster you should do the same for B channels. As you can see in the picture AX 0c port is connected to AYDS1 B-In port, AYDS1 B-Out port is connected to AYDS2 B-In port. Then AY 0a port is connected to AXDS1 B-In port, AXDS1 B-Out port is connected to AXDS2 B-In port. Now both filers are connected to both stacks and in case of one filer failure the other can takeover.

Now we have four additional free ports: A-Out and B-Out in AXDS2 and AYDS2. You can use these ports for multipathing. Connect AX 0d to AXDS2 B-Out, AYe0d to AXDS2 A-Out, AX 0b to AYDS2 A-Out and AY 0b to AXDS2 B-Out. Now if disk shelf module, connection, or host bus adapter fails there is also a redundant path.

Second way which we implemented assumes that each filer owns one FC and one SATA disk shelf. It requires four loops instead of two, because FC and SATA shelves can’t be mixed in one loop. The shortcoming of such configuration is inability to implement multipathing, because each Filer has only four ports and each of it will be used for its own loop.

This time cabling is simpler. AX 0a is connected to AXDS1 A-In, AX 0b is connected to AYDS1 A-In, AY 0a is connected to AXDS2 A-In, AY 0b is connected to AYDS2 A-In. And to implement clustering you need to connect AX 0c to AXDS2 B-In, AX 0d to AYDS2 B-In, AYe0c to AXDS1 B-In and AY 0d to AYDS1 B-In.

Also I need to mention hardware and software disk ownership. In older system ownership was defined by cable connections. Filer which had connection to shelf A-In port owned all disks in this shelf or stack if there were other shelves daisy chained to channel A. Our FAS3020 for instance already supports software ownership where you can assign any disk to any filer in cluster. It means that it doesn’t matter now which port you use for connection – A-In or B-In. You can reassign disks during configuration.