Posts Tagged ‘bootable’

Dell Repository Manager: Bootable ISO Issues

May 23, 2016

problem_solutionIn one of my previous posts I described the process of upgrading a Dell FX2 chassis firmware using Dell Repository Manager (DRM).

In an ideal world you just follow the process and in an hour or two you can get your chassis upgraded. You may sometimes run into issues. I want to go through some of them in this post, including possible remediation.

Issue Description

When exporting firmware to a bootable ISO you can find DRM not being able to download some of the bundle components with the following error in the Job Result:

Processing failed:
Failed downloading files:
Diagnostics_Application_PWMC8_LN64_OSC_1.1_A00.BIN

And errors in the Log:


60. 24/03/2016 5:58:50 PM Export to Bootable ISO : Downloaded 34 / 56
61. 24/03/2016 5:59:44 PM Export to Bootable ISO : Error downloading some files
62. 24/03/2016 5:59:45 PM Export to Bootable ISO : Failed exporting to Bootable ISO.

Workaround #1: Skip the Component

You can try the following option “Continue download irrespective of any error (in the selected components)” in the export dialog. It won’t help to get the component downloaded, but you will got a bootable ISO.

However, DRM will still keep the failed component in the bundle and try to install it during the upgrade, which will obviously fail (update 16/56):

failed_update

Once the upgrade is finished you will get the following error at the end:

Note: Some update requires machine reboot. Please reboot to CD/DVD to continue for the failed update because of the dependency…

upgrade_status

No matter how many times you reboot you will obviously get the same errors. You can ignore it if you 100% sure this is what causes the upgrade to fail or use Workaround #2.

Workaround #2: Create Custom ISO

When you create a repository in DRM it’s populated with pre-built components and bundles. But you can create custom repositories. The idea is that you can exclude the failed component from the repository by creating it manually.

Assuming you already have the base repository configured, do the following:

  • Open the existing repository and click on the Components tab
  • Deselect the failed component in the component list (in my case it was Diagnostics_Application_PWMC8_LN64_OSC_1.1_A00.BIN)
  • Click on the “Copy To” button:

custom_components

  • In the opened dialogue select “Create NEW Repository and copy component(s) into it”
  • Follow the wizard and when you click finish, components will be copied to the newly created repository
  • Open the new repository and click on the Componenets tab
  • Select all components and click on the “Copy to” button once again
  • This time select “Create a NEW Bundle in the same repository and add component(s) into it”
  • On the next screen give the bundle a name and make sure to choose “Linux 32-bit and 64-bit” in the OS Type

custom_bundle

As a result you should get a new bundle created which you can export to a bootable ISO using the same process.

Workaround #3: Use Server Update Utility

If none of the above helps you can fall back to a proven upgrade approach and use Server Update Utility (SUU). SUU is a huge 12GB ISO to download, but you can use Dell Download Manager, which supports resuming interrupted downloads. Make sure to disable proxy! Dell Download Manager does not support resuming an interrupted download if you’re using a proxy server.

SUU is not a bootable ISO. Previously you had to use Dell Systems Build and Update Utility (SBUU) to boot from it first and then mount the ISO to proceed with the upgrade. Starting with Dell 11G servers you don’t need it anymore and can upgrade firmware straight form Dell Lifecycle Controller (LC).

You’ll need to boot into the Lifecycle Controller and choose Firmware Update > Launch Firmware Update > Local Drive(CD or DVD or USB). Mount the SUU ISO and the rest is fairly straightforward. LC will upgrade the firmware and reboot the blade.

lc_upgrade

Conclusion

Dell Repository Manager is the recommended approach to upgrade firmware on Dell hardware. Unlike SUU, DRM downloads the latest updates and only the necessary components. It is also capable of making a bootable ISO.

If you have issues, rely on Server Update Utility as it’s bulletproof and always work. But be prepared to download a 12GB ISO image and make sure you have an option to bypass proxy.

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Painless Dell FX2 Firmware Upgrade

April 10, 2016

Overview

Recently I’ve had a chance to play with Dell’s FX2 chassis for a bit. Dell FX2 falls into the category of blade chassis and can hold up to 8 blades with Atom or 4 blades with Xeon CPUs in a 2U chassis.

Dell_FX2

Besides the compute blades FX2 also supports storage blades, which you can dedicate to particular compute blades and use as additional storage.

On the networking side you can choose from either pass-through modules or three types of I/O aggregators – four 10G SFP+ ports, four 10GBASE-T ports, or two Fibre Channel plus two SFP+ external ports.

The chassis itself also comes in two flavors – FX2 or FX2s. The main difference between the two is that FX2s additionally has PCIe slots at the back, which can be mapped to the server blades to provide additional connectivity.

Dell_FX2_Rear

First step of every hardware solution deployment is a firmware upgrade. But when it comes to firmware on Dell blade equipment be it M1000e, VRTX or FX2 you can quickly get confused. Especially when you go to the blade section and see a dozen of hardware components. Download and update each of them individually would be daunting. Fortunately there is an better way.

blade_firmware

CMC Firmware

Upgrade starts from the chassis management controller, which has two components: Chassis Infrastructure Firmware (or Main Board) and the CMC itself. You can find them on the Chassis Overview > Update tab.

CMC firmware comes as an .exe package, which you can extract. You really need just the fx2_cmc.bin file. During upgrade you will lose access to CMC for 5-10 minutes, while CMC is rebooting.

For the infrastructure firmware you’ll need the fx2_mainboard.bin file. The gotcha with the infrastructure firmware upgrade is that you’ll need all blades to be powered off. So if you have just one chassis this might be tricky.

Blade Firmware

Blades firmware is where this gets interesting. You can certainly upgrade all blades from the CMC by downloading firmware from the Dell support web-site and choosing one component at a time in Chassis Overview > Server Overview > Update section. CMC is capable of upgrading say iDRAC across all blades simultaneously, but it’s still about a dozen components.

The easier approach would be to use Dell Repository Manager (DRM). DRM can download firmware for virtually any blade or rack server (including some of the storage and network hardware) and build a bootable ISO image for an easy upgrade.

To build a bootable ISO follow the following steps:

  • Download and install Dell Repository Manager from the Dell support web-site
  • Add a source by going to Source > View Dell Online Catalog
  • Create a repository by going to Repository > New > Create New Repository
  • In the wizard select your hardware (I selected PowerEdge FC630 from the Blade category) and choose Linux (32-bit and 64-bit) as a DUP format (I’ll explain that later).
  • Go to the newly created repository, select the bundle and click Export

export_bundle

DRM can export bundles in multiple forms, we are interested in a bootable ISO and this is why we selected the Linux DUP format when we created the repository. DRM creates a Linux bootable ISO, so there was no point selecting Windows bundles.

  • Select “Create Bootable ISO (Linux Only)” and continue with the default settings for the rest

As a result you will get an .iso file, which you can mount to the server via iDRAC Remote Console and boot from it for a firmware upgrade.

Network I/O Aggregators

FX2 I/O aggregators are Dell Force10 switches, which use Force10 OS (FTOS). FTOS firmware is NOT available from the Dell web-site. You’ll need to register an account at https://www.force10networks.com to download the firmware.

Make sure to download firmware release specifically built for FX2 I/O aggregators, which can be found in M-Series Software section.

aggregators_firmware

To upgrade the aggregators go to Chassis Overview > I/O Module Overview > Update. Aggregators reset after a reboot, so make sure to upgrade them one at a time. Or if you stacked them instead of using VLT or standalone mode, you’ll have to have a downtime, as stacked switches reboot together.

Conclusion

There is nothing fancy in upgrading firmware on a blade chassis, you want it to be quick and painless. Make sure to use Dell Repository Manager for blades upgrade. It may save you heaps of time and make your life easier.