Posts Tagged ‘HP’

Beginner’s Guide to HPE 5000 Series Switches

October 14, 2017

I don’t closely track the popularity of my blog. If what I share helps people in their day to day job, it’s already good enough to me. But I do look at site statistics now and then just out of curiosity and it seems that network-related posts get a lot of popularity. A blog post I wrote a while ago on Dell N4000 switches has quickly got in top five over the last year.

So it seems that there is a demand for entry-level switch configuration guides. I’ve worked with a quite a few different switch brands over the years, so I thought I will build on the success of the Dell blog post and this time write about HPE FlexNetwork/FlexFabric 5000 switch series.

Operating Systems

HPE has several network switch product lines. I won’t even try to cover all of them in this post. But it’s important to know that there are a few different operating systems you can encounter, while working with HPE network switches. There is a familiar ProCurve product portfolio (now merged with Aruba), which is based on ProVision operating system.

HPE FlexNetwork/FlexFabric 5000 series, on the other hand, is based on Comware operating system. It has a different CLI command set and can be a complete surprise if you’ve worked only with ProCurve switches before. So this blog post will be particularly valuable for those who’re dealing with HPE 5000 for the first time.

The following guide has been tested on a pair of HPE FlexFabric 5700-series switches. Even though commands are mostly the same, on other switch series, like FlexNetwork 5800, there might be some minor differences.

Initial Configuration

When the switch is booted for the first time it will start automatic configuration by trying to obtain settings over DHCP, which you can interrupt by Ctrl+C to get straight to CLI.

You start in user view where you can run display commands to review switch settings. To start the configuration, change to system view:

> system-view

Let’s start by configuring remote access to the switch. There are two ways you can do that. You either use the out-of-band management port:

> interface M-GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
> ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0
> ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1

Or you can configure a VLAN interface IP address:

> interface vlan-interface 1
> ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0
> ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1

Then configure switch name, enable SSH, set passwords and you can start managing the switch over SSH:

> sysname switchname

> public-key local create rsa
> ssh server enable
> user-interface vty 0 15
> authentication-mode scheme
> protocol inbound ssh

> super password simple yourpassword
> local-user admin
> password simple yourpassword
> authorization-attribute user-role level-0
> service-type ssh

User “admin” will have an unprivileged role. You will need to run the following command and enter password once logged in, to elevate to network admin rights:

> super

Intelligent Resilient Framework

In small non-business-critical environments one standalone switch is usually sufficient. In larger environments switches are typically deployed in pairs for redundancy. To simplify management and to avoid network loops most switches support some sort of MLAG or stacking. IRF is HPE’s version of it.

Determine what ports you’re going to use for IRF. There are two QSFP+ ports on 5700-series dedicated for it. And then on on the first switch (master) run the following commands (it’s recommended to shut down the ports before you set them up as IRF):

> irf member 1 priority 32
> int range FortyGigE 1/0/41 to FortyGigE 1/0/42
> shutdown
> irf-port 1/1
> port group interface FortyGigE 1/0/41
> irf-port 1/2
> port group interface FortyGigE 1/0/42
> int range FortyGigE 1/0/41 to FortyGigE 1/0/42
> undo shut
> save
> irf-port-configuration active

On the second switch (slave) run the following commands to change the IRF ID to 2:

> irf member 1 renumber 2
> reboot

When the switch comes up, configure IRF ports:

> irf member 2 priority 30
> int range FortyGigE 2/0/41 to FortyGigE 2/0/42
> shutdown
> irf-port 2/1
> port group interface FortyGigE 2/0/41
> irf-port 2/2
> port group interface FortyGigE 2/0/42
> int range FortyGigE 2/0/41 to FortyGigE 2/0/42
> undo shut
> save
> irf-port-configuration active

Now you can connect the physical IRF ports. IRF is a ring topology, that means (in my case) port 1/0/41 should connect to 2/0/42 and port 1/0/42 should connect to 2/0/41.

Second switch will automatically reboot and if all is configured correctly, you should see both switches join the IRF fabric. Member switch 1 has the highest priority of 32 and becomes the master:

> display irf

Firmware Upgrade

Firmware upgrade is the next logical step after you set up IRF. The latest firmware revision for the switches can be download from HPE web-site. Keep in mind you will need a HPE passport account, with a valid service agreement (SAID) added to it.

You will also need a TFTP server to upgrade the firmware. There are a few of them out there, but the most commonly used is probably Tftpd64.

When you get the TFTP server up and running and copy the firmware file to it, perform an upgrade:

> tftp 10.10.10.20 get 5700-CMW710-R2432P03.ipe
> boot-loader file flash:/5700-CMW710-R2432P03.ipe slot 1 main
> boot-loader file flash:/5700-CMW710-R2432P03.ipe slot 2 main
> irf auto-update enable
> reboot

Confirm firmware has been updated:

> display version

VLANs, Aggregation Groups and Tagging

In Comware the term “aggregation group” is used to describe what is a “port channel” in Cisco world. Trunk/access ports are also called tagged/untagged ports throughout the documentation.

In this section we will discuss a few common port configuration scenarios:

  • Untagged ports, which can be your iSCSI storage array ports
  • Tagged ports, such as your VMware host uplinks
  • Aggregation groups, typically used for LAGs to upstream switches

First of all create all VLANs and give them descriptions:

> vlan 10
> description iSCSI
> vlan 20
> description Server
> vlan 30
> description Dev and test

Then specify untagged ports:

> vlan 10
> port te 1/0/1
> port te 2/0/1

To configure tagged ports and allow certain VLANs (ports will be added to the VLANs automatically):

> int te 1/0/2
> description ESX01 vmnic0
> port link-type trunk
> port trunk permit vlan 20 30
> int te 2/0/2
> description ESX02 vmnic0
> port link-type trunk
> port trunk permit vlan 20 30

And to create an LACP aggregation group:

> interface bridge-aggregation 1
> description Trunk to upstream switch
> link-aggregation mode dynamic
> port link-type trunk
> port trunk permit vlan 20 30

> interface te 1/0/3
> port link-aggregation group 1
> interface te 2/0/3
> port link-aggregation group 1

Common Commands

Other useful commands that don’t fall under any specific category, but handy to know.

Display switch configuration:

> display current-configuration

Save switch configuration:

> save

Shut down a port:

> int te 1/0/27
> shutdown

Undo a command:

> undo shutdown

Conclusion

Whether you are a network engineer new to the Comware operating system or a VMware administrator looking for a quick cheat sheet for FlexNetwork/FlexFabric switches, I hope this guide has helped you get the job done.

If this blog post gets the same amount of popularity, maybe it will turn into another series. But for now – over and out.

Random DC pictures

January 19, 2012

Several pictures of server room hardware with no particular topic.

Click pictures to enlarge.

10kVA APC UPS.

UPS’s Network Management Card (NMC) (with temperature sensor) connected to LAN.

Here you can see battery extenders (white plugs). They allow UPS to support 5kVA of load for 30 mins.

Two Dell PowerEdge 1950 server with 8 cores and 16GB RAM each configured as VMware High Availability (HA) cluster.

Each server has 3 virtual LANs. Each virtual LAN has its own NIC which in its turn has multi-path connection to Cisco switch by two cables, 6 cables in total.

Two Cisco switches which maintain LAN connections for NetApp filers, Dell servers, Sun tape library and APC NMC card. Two switches are tied together by optic cable. Uplink is a 2Gb/s trunk.

HP rack with 9 HP ProLiant servers, HP autoloader and MSA 1500 storage.

HP autoloader with 8 cartridges.

HP MSA 1500 storage which is completely FC.

Hellova cables.

Reinstalling ROCKS compute cluster node

December 1, 2011

If you have any faulty HPC node and want to reinstall it for instance in case of hard drive replacement you should bare in mind several things:

  • Make sure xinetd is listening on 65 for tftpd requests on frontend.
  • Check for firewall rules. But you can simply switch it off during install. Otherwise you’ll get PXE-E32: TFTP open timeout.
  • Then you should configure your frontend to force compute node reinstallation. If you won’t do that you’ll just see PXE-M0F: Exiting HP PXE ROM or similar. Execute the following command on frontend: rocks set host boot <nodename> action=install.
  • In case you get an unable to read package metadata error during installation then go to /export/rocks/install/, remove rocks-dist folder and recreate installation tree by running rocks create distro.
  • After host installation put all  additional packages (like IB, MVAPICH, etc) into /share/apps and run rocks run host <nodename> “rpm -Uvh /share/apps/*.rpm”. Make necessary packages (like openibd and/or opensmd) to run upon startup via chkconfig and start them up. You may also need to copy some manually installed packages to compute node’s /opt directory.
  • In case you commented out faulty node earlier in /opt/torque/server_priv/nodes uncomment it and restart pbs_server service.

This is it. Now you should be good to go.

DC Networking

November 26, 2011

Misc photos from our server rooms. This time networking.

Here I post pictures only from central building. There are also several networking rooms in other buildings. Network core is build primarily on Cisco routers and switches. Branches use HP.

Click pictures to enlarge.

Here are the routers, switches, fibre distribution panels, etc.

Cable mess.

HP BladeSystem c3000

October 29, 2011

We have High Performace Computing (HPC) cluster I’d like to show. It has 72 cores and 152GB of RAM in total. We use ROCKS as cluster middleware. Interconnect is DDR InfiniBand.

We have two groups of servers. First group is two BL2x220c  blades. Since they are double-sided it’s actually four servers. Each with two 4-core CPUs and 16GB of RAM. Second group consists of five BL280c. Each of them also has two 4-core CPUs but 24 GB of RAM. Eighth server is BL260c. This blade serves as master server.

Click pictures to enlarge.

BL280c blade server. This dude has 8 Xeon cores and 24GB of RAM.

Every component of HP BladeSystem c3000 is hot-swappable. Here I show how I disconnect Onboard Adminstrator on fully operational system.

Fans, power supplies and all interconnects are on the back.

Here is the 16-port DDR InfiniBand switch. Each port’s throughput is 80GB/s FDX.

Uplink ports for Onboard Administrator.

16 ports of Ethernet pass-through for blade servers.


Six power supplies in N+1 redundant configuration. Each is capable of 1200 Watts. 7200 Watts in total.

Inside blade server.

InfiniBand mezzanine. One such module is capable of 80Gb/s FDX.

If you are interested in benchmarking results find them here for pure IB and here for IBoIP.

HP BladeSystem c3000 Power Subsystem

October 8, 2011

BladeSystem’s Onboard Administrator provides load of data on power consumption of blades, interconnects and chassis. Here are the basic fields:

  • Present Power – amount of power which is being currently consumed by the whole system.
  • Max Input Power – total amount of power system can draw from line feed. It’s power supply output capacity multiplied by number of power supplies. In my case it’s: 6 x 1200 = 7200 Watts.
  • Power Capacity – amount of power system can draw taking into consideration your power supply redundant status. My configuration is in Power Redundant mode where one power supply is in standby redundant state. Hence Power Capacity for me equals 6000 Watts.
  • Power Allocated – how much power your system can possibly consume in case of CPU load increase, etc. But be carefull, it’s not a theoretical peak for your configuration. This number can change if you power on/power off your blades. Power allocation for power offed blade equals to 0 Watts.

HP e-Certificates

October 3, 2011

Today I spent hellova time to find where you download PDF certificates from HP Smart Portal. Go Certification program in Details section, then My e-Certificates in For HP Certified Professionals only.

HP BladeSystem c3000 power issue

September 28, 2011

Today I faced a problem when HP ProLiant BL260c G5  blade rejected to boot with “System Halted until Power Condition is Corrected” error. Blade sits in HP BladeSystem c3000 chassis. Incident which led to this error was lost of power by one of power supplies. Even though issue was resolved and power restored blade still rejected to boot.

Same problem is described here http://h30499.www3.hp.com/t5/HP-BladeSystem-Chassis-Power/Blade-Power-Error/td-p/1155736 and here http://h30499.www3.hp.com/t5/HP-BladeSystem-Chassis-Power/BL685c-G6-power-issue-Need-advice/td-p/1164218.

Solution to this error was as simple as power cycle the blade by physically disconnecting it from the chassis and plugging back in.

HP BladeSystem c3000 weight

February 9, 2011

Just out of curiosity I’ve calculated weight of our HP BladeSystem c3000:

Power Supply: 1.13 kg x 6 = 6.78 kg
Fan: 1.8 kg x 6 = 10,8 kg
Enclosute: 59 kg
BL2x220c G5: 5.9 kg x 2 = 11.8 kg
BL260c G5: 4.54 kg x 1 = 4.54 kg
BL280c G6: 6.58 kg x 5 = 32.9 kg
All in all it’s about 125kg.