Posts Tagged ‘memory’

How Admission Control Really Works

May 2, 2016

confusionThere is a moment in every vSphere admin’s life when he faces vSphere Admission Control. Quite often this moment is not the most pleasant one. In one of my previous posts I talked about some of the common issues that Admission Control may cause and how to avoid them. And quite frankly Admission Control seems to do more harm than good in most vSphere environments.

Admission Control is a vSphere feature that is built to make sure that VMs with reservations can be restarted in a cluster if one of the cluster hosts fails. “Reservations” is the key word here. There is a common belief that Admission Control protects all other VMs as well, but that’s not true.

Let me go through all three vSphere Admission Control policies and explain why you’re better of disabling Admission Control altogether, as all of these policies give you little to no benefit.

Host failures cluster tolerates

This policy is the default when you deploy a vSphere cluster and policy which causes the most issues. “Host failures cluster tolerates” uses slots to determine if a VM is allowed to be powered on in a cluster. Depending on whether VM has CPU and memory reservations configured it can use one or more slots.

Slot Size

To determine the total number of slots for a cluster, Admission Control uses slot size. Slot size is either the default 32MHz and 128MB of RAM (for vSphere 6) or if you have VMs in the cluster configured with reservations, then the slot size will be calculated based on the maximum CPU/memory reservation. So say if you have 100 VMs, 98 of which have no reservations, one VM has 2 vCPUs and 8GB of memory reserved and another VM has 4 vCPUs and 4GB of memory reserved, then the slot size will jump from 32MHz / 128MB to 4 vCPUs / 8GB of memory. If you have 2.0 GHz CPUs on your hosts, the 4 vCPU reservation will be an equivalent of 8.0 GHz.

Total Number of Slots

Now that we know the slot size, which happens to be 8.0 GHz and 8GB of memory, we can calculate the total number of slots in the cluster. If you have 2 x 8 core CPUs and 256GB of RAM in each of 4 ESXi hosts, then your total amount of resources is 16 cores x 2.0 GHz x 4 hosts = 128 GHz and 256GB x 4 hosts = 1TB of RAM. If your slot size is 4 vCPUs and 8GB of RAM, you get 64 vCPUs / 4 vCPUs = 16 slots (you’ll get more for memory, but the least common denominator has to be used).

total_slots

Practical Use

Now if you configure to tolerate one host failure, you have to subtract four slots from the total number. Every VM, even if it doesn’t have reservations takes up one slot. And as a result you can power on maximum 12 VMs on your cluster. How does that sound?

Such incredibly restrictive behaviour is the reason why almost no one uses it in production. Unless it’s left there by default. You can manually change the slot size, but I have no knowledge of an approach one would use to determine the slot size. That’s the policy number one.

Percentage of cluster resources reserved as failover spare capacity

This is the second policy, which is commonly recommended by most to use instead of the restrictive “Host failures cluster tolerates”. This policy uses percentage-based instead of the slot-based admission.

It’s much more straightforward, you simply specify the percentage of resources you want to reserve. For example if you have four hosts in a cluster the common belief is that if you specify 25% of CPU and memory, they’ll be reserved to restart VMs in case one of the hosts fail. But it won’t. Here’s the reason why.

When calculating amount of free resources in a cluster, Admission Control takes into account only VM reservations and memory overhead. If you have no VMs with reservations in your cluster then HA will be showing close to 99% of free resources even if you’re running 200 VMs.

failover_capacity

For instance, if all of your VMs have 4 vCPUs and 8GB of RAM, then memory overhead would be 60.67MB per VM. For 300 VMs it’s roughly 18GB. If you have two VMs with reservations, say one VM with 2 vCPUs / 4GB of RAM and another VM with 4 vCPUs / 2GB of RAM, then you’ll need to add up your reservations as well.

So if we consider memory, it’s 18GB + 4GB + 2GB = 24GB. If you have the total of 1TB of RAM in your cluster, Admission Control will consider 97% of your memory resources being free.

For such approach to work you’d need to configure reservations on 100% of your VMs. Which obviously no one would do. So that’s the policy number two.

Specify failover hosts

This is the third policy, which typically is the least recommended, because it dedicates a host (or multiple hosts) specifically just for failover. You cannot run VMs on such hosts. If you try to vMotion a VM to it, you’ll get an error.

failover_host

In my opinion, this policy would actually be the most useful for reserving cluster resources. You want to have N+1 redundancy, then reserve it. This policy does exactly that.

Conclusion

When it comes to vSphere Admission Control, everyone knows that “Host failures cluster tolerates” policy uses slot-based admission and is better to be avoided.

There’s a common misconception, though, that “Percentage of cluster resources reserved as failover spare capacity” is more useful and can reserve CPU and memory capacity for host failover. But in reality it’ll let you run as many VMs as you want and utilize all of your cluster resources, except for the tiny amount of CPU and memory for a handful of VMs with reservations you may have in your environment.

If you want to reserve failover capacity in your cluster, either use “Specify failover hosts” policy or simply disable Admission Control and keep an eye on your cluster resource utilization manually (or using vROps) to make sure you always have room for growth.

Implications of Ignoring vSphere Admission Control

April 5, 2016

no-admissionHA Admission Control has historically been on of the lesser understood vSphere topics. It’s not intuitive how it works and what it does. As a result it’s left configured with default values in most vSphere environments. But default Admission Control setting are very restrictive and can often cause issues.

In this blog post I want to share the two most common issues with vSphere Admission Control and solutions to these issues.

Issue #1: Not being able to start a VM

Description

Probably the most common issue everyone encounters with Admission Control is when you suddenly cannot power on VMs any more. There are multiple reasons why that might happen, but most likely you’ve just configured a reservation on one of your VMs or deployed a VM from an OVA template with a pre-configured reservation. This has triggered a change in Admission Control slot size and based on the new slot size you no longer have enough slots to satisfy failover requirements.

As a result you get the following alarm in vCenter: “Insufficient vSphere HA failover resources”. And when you try to create and boot a new VM you get: “Insufficient resources to satisfy configured failover level for vSphere HA”.

admission_error

Cause

So what exactly has happened here. In my example a new VM with 4GHz of CPU and 4GB of RAM was deployed. Admission Control was set to its default “Host Failures Cluster Tolerates” policy. This policy uses slot sizes. Total amount of resources in the cluster is divided by the slot size (4GHz and 4GB in the above case) and then each VM (even if it doesn’t have a reservation) uses at least 1 slot. Once you configure a VM reservation, depending on the number of VMs in your cluster more often than not you get all slots being used straight away. As you can see based on the calculations I have 91 slots in the cluster, which have instantly been used by 165 running VMs.

slot_calculations

Solution

You can control the slot size manually and make it much smaller, such as 1GHz and 1GB of RAM. That way you’d have much more slots. The VM from my previous example would use four slots. And all other VMs which have no reservations would use less slots in total, because of a smaller slot size. But this process is manual and prone to error.

The better solution is to use “Percentage of Cluster Resources” policy, which is recommended for most environments. We’ll go over the main differences between the three available Admission Control policies after we discuss the second issue.

Issue #2: Not being able to enter Maintenance Mode

Description

It might be a corner case, but I still see it quite often. It’s when you have two hosts in a cluster (such as ROBO, DR or just a small environment) and try to put one host into maintenance mode.

The first issue you will encounter is that VMs are not automatically vMotion’ed to other hosts using DRS. You have to evacuate VMs manually.

And then once you move all VMs to the other host and put it into maintenance mode, you again can no longer power on VMs and get the same error: “Insufficient resources to satisfy configured failover level for vSphere HA”.

poweron_fail

Cause

This happens because disconnected hosts and hosts in maintenance mode are not used in Admission Control calculations. And one host is obviously not enough for failover, because if it fails, there are no other hosts to fail over to.

Solution

If you got caught up in such situation you can temporarily disable Admission Control all together until you finish maintenance. This is the reason why it’s often recommended to have at least 3 hosts in a cluster, but it can not always be justified if you have just a handful of VMs.

Alternatives to Slot Size Admission Control

There are another two Admission Control policies. First is “Specify a Failover Host”, which dedicates a host (or hosts) for failover. Such host acts as a hot standby and can run VMs only in a failover situation. This policy is ideal if you want to reserve failover resources.

And the second is “Percentage of Cluster Resources”. Resources under this policy are reserved based on the percentage of total cluster resources. If you have five hosts in your cluster you can reserve 20% of resources (which is equal to one host) for failover.

This policy uses percentage of cluster resources, instead of slot sizes, and hence doesn’t have the issues of the “Host Failures Cluster Tolerates” policy. There is a gotcha, if you add another five hosts to your cluster, you will need to change reservation to 10%, which is often overlooked.

Conclusion

“Percentage of Cluster Resources” policy is recommended to use in most cases to avoid issues with slot sizes. What is important to understand is that the goal of this policy is just to guarantee that VMs with reservations can be restarted in a host failure scenario.

If a VM has no reservations, then “Percentage of Cluster Resources” policy will use only memory overhead of this VM in its calculations. Which is probably the most confusing part about Admission Control in general. But that’s a topic for the next blog post.

 

NetApp NVRAM and Write Caching

July 19, 2013

388375Overview

NetApp storage systems use several types of memory for data caching. Non-volatile battery-backed memory (NVRAM) is used for write caching (whereas main memory and flash memory in forms of either extension PCIe card or SSD drives is used for read caching). Before going to hard drives all writes are cached in NVRAM. NVRAM memory is split in half and each time 50% of NVRAM gets full, writes are being cached to the second half, while the first half is being written to disks. If during 10 seconds interval NVRAM doesn’t get full, it is forced to flush by a system timer.

To be more precise, when data block comes into NetApp it’s actually written to main memory and then journaled in NVRAM. NVRAM here serves as a backup, in case filer fails. When data has been written to disks as part of so called Consistency Point (CP), write blocks which were cached in main memory become the first target to be evicted and replaced by other data.

Caching Approach

NetApp is frequently criticized for small amounts of write cache. For example FAS3140 has only 512MB of NVRAM, FAS3220 has a bit more 1,6GB. In mirrored HA or MetroCluster configurations NVRAM is mirrored via NVRAM interconnect adapter. Half of the NVRAM is used for local operations and another half for the partner’s. In this case the amount of write cache becomes even smaller. In FAS32xx series NVRAM has been integrated into main memory and is now called NVMEM. You can check the amount of NVRAM/NVMEM in your filer by running:

> sysconfig -a

The are two answers to the question why NetApp includes less cache in their controllers. The first one is given in white paper called “Optimizing Storage Performance and Cost with Intelligent Caching“. It states that NetApp uses different approach to write caching, compared to other vendors. Most often when data block comes in, cache is used to keep the 8KB data block, as well as 8KB inode and 8KB indirect block for large files. This way, write cache can be thought as part of the physical file system, because it mimics its structure. NetApp on the other hand uses journaling approach. When data block is received by the filer, 8KB data block is cached along with 120B header. Header contains all the information needed to replay the operation. After each cache flush Consistency Point (CP) is created, which is a special type of consistent file system snapshot. If controller fails, the only thing which needs to be done is reverting file system to the latest consistency point and replaying the log.

But this white paper was written in 2010. And cache journaling is not a feature unique to NetApp. Many vendors are now using it. The other answer, which makes more sense, was found on one of the toaster mailing list archives here: NVRAM weirdness (UNCLASSIFIED). I’ll just quote the answer:

The reason it’s so small compared to most arrays is because of WAFL. We don’t need that much NVRAM because when writes happen, ONTAP writes out single complete RAID stripes and calculates parity in memory. If there was a need to do lots of reads to regenerate parity, then we’d have to increase the NVRAM more to smooth out performance.

NVLOG Shipping

A feature called NVLOG shipping is an integral part of sync and semi-sync SnapMirror. NVLOG shipping is simply a transfer of NVRAM writes from the primary to a secondary storage system.  Writes on primary cannot be transferred directly to NVRAM of the secondary system, because in contrast to mirrored HA and MetroCluster, SnapMirror doesn’t have any hardware implementation of the NVRAM mirroring. That’s why the stream of data is firstly written to the special files on the volume’s parent aggregate on the secondary system and then are read to the NVRAM.

nvram

Documents I found useful:

WP-7107: Optimizing Storage Performance and Cost with Intelligent Caching

TR-3326: 7-Mode SnapMirror Sync and SnapMirror Semi-Sync Overview and Design Considerations

TR-3548: Best Practices for MetroCluster Design and Implementation

United States Patent 7730153: Efficient use of NVRAM during takeover in a node cluster

Increasing DB2 buffer pools

February 15, 2012

Just a small tip on DB2 memory allocation. It’s very well described in a number of articles, like this or in IBM DB2 official guide on Troubleshooting and Tuning Database Performance. What I want to describe here is how to increase buffer pools, probably one of the most important tuning parameters and very basic at the same time. The issue you can run into is when you increase buffer pool size you get an error SQL20189W:

The buffer pool operation (CREATE/ALTER) will not take effect until the next database startup due to insufficient memory.

It is not just a warning which suggests you to reboot. In fact, after a reboot your buffer pools won’t activate due to insufficient memory and database will work using small system buffers which will drastically decrease performance.

The reason why it happens is global memory cap which is configured in instance Configuration Parameters and called INSTANCE_MEMORY. It’s a total amount of memory which this instance can use for its operations. In order to have bigger buffer pools you must also increase this parameter. After that, SQL20189W goes away and you can tweak buffer pool memory on-the-fly. To check that change has happened use:

db2mtrk -d -v

and look for the line like

Buffer Pool Heap (1) is of size 3343450112 bytes

Out of memory issues in Openfire

October 24, 2011

We are constantly getting following errors in Openfire 3.6.4 installation:

java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded

java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space

It turns out that it’s a common error for 3.6.4.  Read this announcement Suffering from memory-related issues in Openfire? Read this! and this forum thread Openfire 3.6.4 memory leak with Empathy.

This error is related to memory leak in PEP which implements extended statuses. Since we don’t use them we just switched PEP off. Go to your Openfire admin console, select Server->Server Manager->System Properties at the bottom add property xmpp.pep.enabled value false. Restart server.

Update: this actually didn’t help us. Probably the only way is to upgrade to the latest stable version.