Posts Tagged ‘SAN’

Resize limits for SAN LUNs

July 1, 2013

If you run lun resize command on NetApp you might run into the following error:

lun resize: New size exceeds this LUN’s initial geometry

The reason behind it is that each SAN LUN has head/cylinder/sector geometry. It’s not an actual physical mapping to the underlying disks and has no meaning these days. It’s simply a SCSI protocol artifact. But it imposes limitation on maximum LUN resize. Geometry is chosen at initial LUN creation and cannot be changed. Roughly you can resize the LUN to the size, which is 10 times bigger than the size at the time of creation. For example, the 50GB LUN can be extended to the maximum of 502GB. See the table below for the maximum sizes:

Initial Size   Maximum Sizedata-storage
< 50g          502g
51-100g        1004g
101-150g       1506g
151-200g       2008g
201-251g       2510g
252-301g       3012g
302-351g       3514g
352-401g       4016g

To check the maximum size for particular LUN use the following commands:

> priv set diag
> lun gemetry lun_path
> priv set

If you run into this issue, unfortunately you will need to create a new LUN, copy all the data using robocopy for example and make a cutover. Because such features as volume level SnapMirror or ndmpcopy will recreate the LUN’s geometry together with the data.

Zoning vs. LUN masking explained

September 28, 2012

Zoning and masking terms are often confused by those who just started working with SAN. But it takes 5 minutes googling to understand that the main difference is that zoning is configured on a SAN switch on a port basis (or WWN) and masking is a storage feature with LUN granularity. All modern hardware supports zoning and masking. Given that, the much more interesting question here is what’s the point of zoning if there is masking with finer granularity.

Both security features do the same thing, restrict access to particular storage targets. And it seems that there is no point in configuring both of them. But that’s not true. One, not that convincing argument, is that in case one of the features is accidentally misconfigured, you still maintain security. But the much bigger issue in no-zoning configuration are RSCNs. RSCNs are Registered State Change Notification messages which are issued by SAN Name Server service when fabric changes it’s configuration (new device has been added to the fabric, a zone has changed, a switch name or IP address has changed, etc). RSCNs can be disruptive to fabric operation. And if you don’t have zones RSCNs are flooded to everyone each time something changes in a fabric, even if it has nothing to do with majority of devices. So zoning is a SAN best practice and its configuration is highly recommended.

In fact, Brocade recommends to adopt a so called Single Initiator Zoning (SIZ) practice, when one host pWWN (initiator) is zoned to one or more storage pWWNs. It reduces RSCN issue to a minimum.

As a best reference read Brocade’s: Secure SAN Zoning – Best Practices.