Posts Tagged ‘server’

[SOLVED] Migrating vCenter Notifications

January 6, 2018

Why is this a problem?

VMware upgrades and migrations still comprise a large chunk of what I do in my job. If it is an in-place upgrade it is often more straightforward. The main consideration is making sure all compatibility checks are made. But if it is a rebuild, things get a bit more complicated.

Take for example a vCenter Server to vCenter Server Appliance migration. If you are migrating between 5.5, 6.0 and 6.5 you are covered by the vCenter Server Migration Tool. Recently I came across a customer using vSphere 5.1 (yes, it is not as uncommon as you might think). vCenter Server Migration Tool does not support migration from vSphere 5.1, which is fair enough, as it is end of support was August 2016. But as a result, you end up being on your own with your upgrade endeavours and have to do a lot of the things manually. One of such things is migrating vCenter notifications.

You can go and do it by hand. Using a few PowerCLI commands you can list the currently configured notifications and then recreate them on the new vCenter. But knowing how clunky and slow this process is, I doubt you are looking forward to spend half a day configuring each of the dozens notifications one by one by hand (I sure am not).

I offer an easy solution

You may have seen a comic over on xkcd called “Is It Worth The Time?“. Which gives you an estimate of how long you can work on making a routine task more efficient before you are spending more time than you save (across five years). As an example, if you can save one hour by automating a task that you do monthly, even if you spend two days on automating it, you will still brake even in five years.

Knowing how often I do VMware upgrades, it is well worth for me to invest time in automating it by scripting. Since you do not do upgrades that often, for you it is not, so I wrote this script for you.

If you simply want to get the job done, you can go ahead and download it from my GitHub page here (you will also need VMware PowerCLI installed on your machine for it to work) and then run it like so:

.\copy-vcenter-alerts-v1.0.ps1 -SourceVcenter old-vc.acme.com -DestinationVcenter new-vc.acme.com

Script includes help topics, that you can view by running the following command:

Get-Help -full .\copy-vcenter-alerts-v1.0.ps1

Or if you are curious, you can read further to better understand how script works.

How does this work?

First of all, it is important to understand the terminology used in vSphere:

  • Alarm trigger – a set of conditions that must be met for an alarm warning and alert to occur.
  • Alarm action – operations that occur in response to triggered alarms. For example, email notifications.

Script takes source and destination vCenter IP addresses or host names as parameters and starts by retrieving the list of existing alerts. Then it compares alert definitions and if alert doesn’t exist on the destination, it will be skipped, so be aware of that. Script will show you a warning and you will be able to make a decision about what to do with such alert later.

Then for each of the source alerts, that exists on the destination, script recreates actions, with exact same triggers. Trigger settings, such as repeats (enabled/disabled) and trigger state changes (green to yellow, yellow to red, etc) are also copied.

Script will not attempt to recreate an action that already exists, so feel free to run the script multiple times, if you need to.

What script does not do

  1. Script does not copy custom alerts – if you have custom alert definitions, you will have to recreate them manually. It was not worth investing time in such feature at this stage, as custom alerts are rare and even if encountered, there us just a handful, that can be moved manually.
  2. Only email notification actions are supported – because they are the most common. If you use other actions, like SNMP traps, let me know and maybe I will include them in the next version.

PowerCLI cmdlets used

These are some of the useful VMware PowerCLI cmdlets I used to write the script:

  • Get-AlarmDefinition
  • Get-AlarmAction
  • Get-AlarmActionTrigger
  • New-AlarmAction
  • New-AlarmActionTrigger
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Changing hostname of the DB2 server

February 14, 2012

Recently we’ve migrated our DB2 instance to a new server. This involved moving domain name of the old server to the new one. We didn’t change the name of the new server, but just made an alias. After that we changed domain name of the old server because we wanted to leave a backup ground in case something happens. However, after reboot old database refused to start. I found good article here on IBM site, but I couldn’t run any DB2 command from CLI, they stopped working all at once.

The tip here is to go to HKLM\ SOFTWARE\ IBM\ DB2\ GLOBAL_PROFILE and HKLM\ SOFTWARE\ IBM\ DB2\ InstalledCopies\ DB2COPY1\ GLOBAL_PROFILE branches of the registry and change DB2_ADMINGROUP, DB2_USERSGROUP and DB2SYSTEM accordingly. After restart I was able to run DB2 CLI commands.

Then I stick to the IBM article. Particularly I ran the following commands:

db2 uncatalog node SQL
db2 catalog admin tcpip node OLDSQL remote OLDSQL system OLDSQL
db2 update admin cfg using DB2SYSTEM OLDSQL
db2 update admin cfg using SMTP_SERVER OLDSQL

This, along with two reboots, solved the problem.

Random DC pictures

January 19, 2012

Several pictures of server room hardware with no particular topic.

Click pictures to enlarge.

10kVA APC UPS.

UPS’s Network Management Card (NMC) (with temperature sensor) connected to LAN.

Here you can see battery extenders (white plugs). They allow UPS to support 5kVA of load for 30 mins.

Two Dell PowerEdge 1950 server with 8 cores and 16GB RAM each configured as VMware High Availability (HA) cluster.

Each server has 3 virtual LANs. Each virtual LAN has its own NIC which in its turn has multi-path connection to Cisco switch by two cables, 6 cables in total.

Two Cisco switches which maintain LAN connections for NetApp filers, Dell servers, Sun tape library and APC NMC card. Two switches are tied together by optic cable. Uplink is a 2Gb/s trunk.

HP rack with 9 HP ProLiant servers, HP autoloader and MSA 1500 storage.

HP autoloader with 8 cartridges.

HP MSA 1500 storage which is completely FC.

Hellova cables.

HP BladeSystem c3000

October 29, 2011

We have High Performace Computing (HPC) cluster I’d like to show. It has 72 cores and 152GB of RAM in total. We use ROCKS as cluster middleware. Interconnect is DDR InfiniBand.

We have two groups of servers. First group is two BL2x220c  blades. Since they are double-sided it’s actually four servers. Each with two 4-core CPUs and 16GB of RAM. Second group consists of five BL280c. Each of them also has two 4-core CPUs but 24 GB of RAM. Eighth server is BL260c. This blade serves as master server.

Click pictures to enlarge.

BL280c blade server. This dude has 8 Xeon cores and 24GB of RAM.

Every component of HP BladeSystem c3000 is hot-swappable. Here I show how I disconnect Onboard Adminstrator on fully operational system.

Fans, power supplies and all interconnects are on the back.

Here is the 16-port DDR InfiniBand switch. Each port’s throughput is 80GB/s FDX.

Uplink ports for Onboard Administrator.

16 ports of Ethernet pass-through for blade servers.


Six power supplies in N+1 redundant configuration. Each is capable of 1200 Watts. 7200 Watts in total.

Inside blade server.

InfiniBand mezzanine. One such module is capable of 80Gb/s FDX.

If you are interested in benchmarking results find them here for pure IB and here for IBoIP.