Jumbo Frames justified?

When it comes to VMware on NetApp, boosting  performance by implementing Jumbo Frames is always taken into consideration. However, it’s not clear if it really has any significant impact on latency and throughput.

Officially VMware doesn’t support Jumbo Frames for NAS and iSCSI. It means that using Jumbo Frames to transfer storage traffic from VMkernel interface to your storage system is the solution which is not tested by VMware, however, it actually works. To use Jumbo Frames you need to activate them throughout the whole communication path: OS, virtual NIC (change to Enchanced vmxnet from E1000), Virtual Switch and VMkernel, physical ethernet switch and storage. It’s a lot of work to do and it’s disruptive at some points, which is not a good idea for production infrastructure. So I decided to take a look at benchmarks, before deciding to spend a great amount of time and effort on it.

VMware and NetApp has a TR-3808-0110 technical report which is called “VMware vSphere and ESX 3.5 Multiprotocol Performance Comparison Using FC, iSCSI, and NFS”. Section 2.2 clearly states that:

  • Using NFS with jumbo frames enabled using both Gigabit and 10GbE generated overall performance that was comparable to that observed using NFS without jumbo frames and required approximately 6% to 20% fewer ESX CPU resources compared to using NFS without jumbo frames, depending on the test configuration.
  • Using iSCSI with jumbo frames enabled using both Gigabit and 10GbE generated overall performance that was comparable to slightly lower than that observed using iSCSI without jumbo and required approximately 12% to 20% fewer ESX CPU resources compared to using iSCSI without jumbo frames depending on the test configuration.
Another important statement here is:
  • Due to the smaller request sizes used in the workloads, it was not expected that enabling jumbo frames would improve overall performance.

I believe that 4K and 8K packet sizes are fair in case of virtual infrastructure. Maybe if you move large amounts of data through your virtual machines it will make sense for you, but I feel like it’s not reasonable to implement Jumbo Frames for virual infrastructure in general.

The another report finding is that Jumbo Frames decrease CPU load, but if you use TOE NICs, then no sense once again.

VMware supports jumbo frames with the following NICs: Intel (82546, 82571), Broadcom (5708, 5706, 5709), Netxen (NXB-10GXxR, NXB-10GCX4), and Neterion (Xframe, Xframe II, Xframe E). We use Broadcom NetXtreme II BCM5708 and Intel 82571EB, so Jumbo Frames implementation is not going to be a problem. Maybe I’ll try to test it by myself when I’ll have some free time.

Links I found useful:

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “Jumbo Frames justified?”

  1. Dell Force10 Part 1: Initial Configuration | Niktips's Blog Says:

    […] a difference for iSCSI/NFS storage implementations. I did a post about Jumbo Frames long time ago here and hasn’t changed my opinion ever since. Interested to here your thoughts if have a […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: